Useful Tips

Instructions for using the MIL DOT mesh

Pin
Send
Share
Send
Send


The Mil-Dot reticle (Milliradian Dot) has become very popular among snipers, athletes, and hunters alike. Its amenities are obvious: knowing the size of the object, you can quickly determine the distance to it, in addition, you can make corrections both vertically and horizontally without twisting the drums of corrections of the sight, and at extreme distances leave the opportunity to make additional adjustments.

The abbreviation Mil-Dot is derived from Milliradian Dot (milliradian point). Hence the name of the unit of measurement - Mil, Mil, short for "milliradians". 1 milliradian = 1 thousandth of a distance = 3.4377 MOA (Minute of angle or angular minute = 2.9 cm per 100 m)

Distance Measurement with Mil-Dot

Determination of distance, basics

  • Estimate the size of the object by which you will determine the distance.
  • Measure the object in miles using the MilDot grid.
  • Using the formula, calculate the distance in meters to the object

Example: 1.2 mx 1000/2 = 600 m

The determination of the distance on the figure of a person

As a rule, the average person height of 1.8 m is taken and is taken as the basis for calculating the distance according to height. If the shooter is sure of a different growth of a person, it is certainly possible to take these data as a basis.

The picture shows the distance obtained by applying the grid to the image of a person, according to the calculation formula.

Introduction of amendments to the Mil-Dot grid

We recalculate the values ​​of the Mil-Dot grid in the MOA, that is, translate the milliradians into angular minutes.
We use the formula 1 milliradian = 3.4377 MOA.
You get the following picture:

Example No. 1

We have .223Rem caliber ammunition from the Tula plant.
And we have a table of vertical corrections in the MOA of this munition
Vertical amendments in MOA

Distance, meters050100200250300350400450500
Sighting 100 m----0.31.83.14.66.28.110.212.6
Sighting 200 m----- 1.5- 1.81.32.84.46.38.410.8
Sighting 300 m---- 4.3- 4.6- 2.8- 1.51.73.55.68.0

After recounting for the Mil-Dot grid, we get, for example, for a weapon shot 100 meters away the following picture:

For weapons shot at 200 m:

Example No. 2

Take fox as target

Fox distance

The height of her body is usually 25 cm. We measure the fox. Its angular size is 1 mil.
We calculate the distance: (0.25 m x 1000) / 1 Mil = 250 meters.
We determine the vertical correction
We have ammunition caliber .223Rem of the Tula plant.
Relative path reduction, cm

Distance, meters050100150200250300350400450500
100 meter sighting- 4.0- 0.2- 3.8- 12.7- 27.8- 50.5- 82.7-127.0-186.4- 264.3

For a distance of 250, we see a decrease in the trajectory of -27.8 cm.

Amendment in Miles: (0.27.8 m x 1000) / 250 meters = 1.112 Mils

We calculate the aiming point

It turns out that with a small error, you can take the aiming point, which is 1.125 Mil from the center

Table for quick work with Mil-Dot

Using the table is as follows:

  • Estimate the size of the object by which you will determine the distance.
  • Find the corresponding column in the table.
  • Measure the object in miles using the Mil-Dot grid.
  • Find the corresponding row in the table.
  • Moving along the line to the intersection with the previously selected column, find the number
  • giving the distance in meters to the object.

The article is based on the materials of the magazine Caliber, issue No. 1

MOA (Minute Of Angle - Angular Minute)

In the West, in ballistics, this angular value is widely used to assess the accuracy of hits, corrections during shooting, etc. By the way, instead of this, we use a different, linear value - a thousandth of a distance.

  • The circle is 360 degrees,
  • 1 degree is 60 arc minutes
  • In a circle - 21 600 arc minutes.
  • In a circle - 2 * 3.14 radians

As you can see, the distance and diameter of the circle of hits form a triangle, solving which, we calculate the angle .

 = 2 tan -1 ((C / 2) / d), where d is the distance in inches, C is the diameter of the circle in inches

In the West, they describe groups of hits on targets in the MOA because this angular width is almost exactly equal to one inch at 100 yards, then it expands and becomes two inches at 200 yards, three inches at 300 yards and so on up to 10 inches at 1000 yards.

When you say that your rifle stacks bullets in a circle 1 inch in diameter at a distance of 100 yards, you can also say that the accuracy of your rifle is about 1 MOA (angular minute) and this will be a more accurate characteristic because it automatically means that the rifle gives a group of hits in a circle with a diameter of 2 inches at 200 yards, 4 inches at 400 and so on.

What if your rifle hits a two-inch group at 100 yards? Simply, the odds are the same. You are just starting to count with a wider group of hits. This two-inch rifle should therefore give a four-inch group at 200 yards (twice as wide, understand?), Then a 10-inch group at 500 yards, since the distance is 5 times larger and the group width is also 5 times larger than 2 inches at 100 yards.

By expressing your hit groups and reducing trajectory in the MOA, you can understand how your rifle will behave at any distance. And having understood, it is very accurate to introduce corrections into the sight.

In import sights, adjustments are counted in MOA.
For example:
Let's say in your sight one click = 1/4 MOA. You shoot 300 yards and the bullet hits 15 inches lower.
We calculate the correction: 15 (inches) / 3 (hundreds of yards) = 5 MOA or 20 clicks on your sight.

More about the "price" of the click of the sight - below

To make the relationship between distance and MOA clear, see the table.

Distance Determination Using the Mil-Dot Grid

Using

  • Estimate the size of the object by which you will determine the distance.
  • Measure an object in miles with a grid. Mil dot.
  • Using the formula, calculate the distance in meters to the object.

Formulas

  • Width or height of the object (in meters) x 1004 / Width or height of the object (in miles) = Distance (in meters)
  • Width or height of the object (in centimeters) x 10 / Width or height of the object (in miles) = Distance (in meters)

Example:

40 cm x 10/2 mil = 200 meters

Formula to calculate the distance in meters to the object on the Mil-Dot grid

Width or height of the object (in meters) x 1004
---------------------------------------------- = Distance (in meters)
Width or height of the object (in miles)

Width or height of the object (in centimeters) x 10
------------------------------------------------- = Distance (in meters)
Width or height of the object (in miles)


For example:
40 cm x 10/2 mil = 200 meters

Pin
Send
Share
Send
Send